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Hari Mohan Sharma, 60, Basti Harpool Singh, New Delhi vs. ACIT, Circle-63(1), New Delhi
February, 01st 2019
                    INCOME TAX APPELLATE TRIBUNAL
                       DELHI BENCH E: NEW DELHI
              BEFORE SHRI H. S. SIDHU , JUDICIAL MEMBER
                                       AND
           SHRI PRASHANT MAHARISHI, ACCOUNTANT MEMBER


                              ITA No. 2953/Del/2018
                             (Assessment Year: 2014-15)
          Hari Mohan Sharma,             Vs.                ACIT,
        60, Basti Harpool Singh,                        Circle-63(1),
               New Delhi                                  New Delhi
           PAN: AARPS6592G
               (Appellant)                             (Respondent)


                              ITA No. 2954/Del/2018
                             (Assessment Year: 2014-15)
         Madan Mohan Sharma,             Vs.                ACIT,
        60, Basti Harpool Singh,                        Circle-63(1),
               New Delhi                                  New Delhi
           PAN: AARPS6590E
               (Appellant)                             (Respondent)


              Assessee by :                     Shri Salil Aggarwal, Adv
                                               Shri Sahilesh Gupta, Adv
                                               Shri Madhur Aggarwal, Adv
               Revenue by:                      Ms. Rinku Singh, Sr. DR
             Date of Hearing                         08/01/2019
         Date of pronouncement                       31/01/2019


                                    ORDER
PER PRASHANT MAHARISHI, A. M.
1.   These are the two appeals filed by the      different assesses, joint owners of
     the one property and involving identical grounds of appeal, therefore both
     these appeals are heard together and disposed of by this common order

                                                                             Page | 1
2.   Shri Hari Mohan Sharma , assessee has raised the following grounds of
     appeal in ITA No. 2953/Del/2018 for the Assessment Year 2014-15:-
     1.    That the learned CIT(A) has erred both on facts and in law, in
           confirming the order of assessment and has further erred in vaguely
           enhancing the income of the appellant.
     1.1   That the order of learned CIT(A) in enhancing the income is without
           jurisdiction and is wholly arbitrary and is thus unsustainable in law.
     2.    That even when enhancing, the income, the learned CIT(A) has neither
           stated the income by which the total income is enhanced or even the
           source of income or head of the income, which is stated to have been
           enhanced.
     3.    That the order of the learned CIT(A) in confirming the assessment is
           based on misconceived and erroneous assumption and on non-existent
           facts and hence is unsustainable in law.
     4.    That the learned CIT(A) has failed to appreciate that the assessee had
           sold its 1 /3rd share of property bearing No. R - 515, New Rajinder
           Nagar, New Delhi, under an registered agreement of sale of which
           possession had been handed over to the vendee, who took the
           possession thereof, which had been duly confirmed. The finding that
           the assessee had not transferred the property is entirely erroneous and
           is based on no valid material.
     5.    That the learned CIT(A) has failed to appreciate that having established
           the vendee had entered into an agreement of sale and had paid the
           consideration through cheques, which had duly been recorded in the
           accounts of the vendee who took the possession, could not have held
           that the assessee is not entitled to claim of deduction in accordance
           with provisions of section 54 of the Income Tax Act.
     6.    That the learned CIT(A) has also failed to appreciate that the claim of
           deduction had been made when the assessee had acquired the
           property at 1 Ajmal Khan Road, which too was duly registered in his
           name and as such the claim of exemption of the capital gain was made
           after due compliance of statutory provision.
     7.    That the learned CIT(A) has erred in rejecting the claim of the assessee
           made u/s 54 of the Act on the assumption that subsequently the said

                                                                             Page | 2
      sale deed stood cancelled. In doing so, the learned CIT (A) has failed to
      appreciate that under law, a transaction is complete soon the sale deed
      is executed and is transfer in law.
8.    That in any case and without prejudice, the learned CIT(A) has failed to
      appreciate that the burden was on the revenue to establish that the
      assessee had neither sold the asset nor had acquired the asset so as to
      disallow the claim made of computing the capital gain which was in
      accordance with the statutory provisions. He has failed to appreciate
      that before disallowing the claim, the burden was on the revenue,
      which had not been discharged by leading any valid material.
9.    The learned CIT (A) has further erred in placing the burden on the
      assessee to establish the source of the funds which he had received as
      consideration of purchase by the vendee.
10.   The learned CIT (A) has further erred in not appreciating that the
      assessee had also led the prima-facie evidence to establish the source
      of the funds of the vendee and the vendee having not disputed that the
      consideration was paid by the vendee, could not have held that the
      source of the funds was that of assessee which was not even the case
      of the learned AO.
11.   The learned CIT (A) has failed to appreciate that the burden to establish
      the source of the funds in the account of vendee was not on the
      assessee. In holding that the bur den was on the assessee, she has
      ignored the law' laid down by the Patna High Court in the case of
      Jhaverbhai Bihari Lai & Co. vs. CIT reported in 154 ITR 591 at page
      597. That in any case and without prejudice even such a burden which
      though was not on the assessee, was discharged by him which
      establishes beyond doubt the source of the funds of the vendee was the
      vendee's own funds and not of the assessee.
12.   That further the learned CIT (A) has also failed to comprehend that the
      assessee had discharged his onus, when it had furnished the
      confirmation from the vendee, who had acquired the property from the
      assessee and paid the consideration which consideration, had been
      paid by the vendee through its accounts. The learned CIT (A) has not
      only misread the evidence but has drawn erroneous inferences. The

                                                                        Page | 3
      inferences drawn by the learned CIT(A) is on complete misreading of
      the evidence and is based on a biased and pre-determined approach
      and is thus vitiated in law.
13.   That further the adverse finding recorded by the learned CIT (A) in her
      order that the transaction was colorable is entirely and wholly
      erroneous. In fact she has failed to comprehend that the assessee
      having obtained the balance sheet in support that the vendee has not
      disputed the purchase of property which is duly reflected iii their
      account, could not have ignored the balance sheet.
14.   That in enhancing the income, the learned CIT(A) has failed to
      appreciate that the Full Bench of Delhi High Court in 251 ITR 864 which
      is binding on the learned CIT(A) has held that the learned CIT(A) in
      appeal before him could not tackle a new source of income and thus
      when the learned CIT(A) proposed to enhance the income by tackling a
      new source of income, the same having been objected, should not have
      proceeded to tackle the said source of income. The judgment referred to
      by the learned CIT(A) in the order have duly been considered by the
      Full Bench and as such the learned CIT(A) has committed a gross error
      of law when the binding decision has been overreached by her on the
      basis of imaginative and non-supportive grounds.
15.   That the learned CIT (A) has misread the judgments in the case of Jute
      Corporation of India vs. CIT, reported in 187 ITR 688 and also in the
      case of CIT vs. Nribherarn Deluram (sic Daluram) reported in 224 ITR
      610. Both the cases cited by the learned CIT(A) in her order had duly
      been considered by the Full Bench of Delhi High Court when it held that
      the CIT(A) has no power of enhancement in respect of a new source of
      income, not considered in the course of proceedings by the AO and was
      not even the subject matter of appeal before him, was bound to have
      held that notice of enhancement had erroneously been issued and
      ought to have dropped the proceedings. That further the learned CIT(A)
      has erred in holding that the enhanced sum is an income from
      undisclosed sources arid taxable u/s 115BBE of the Act despite the
      fact even the sum was not the income and was exceeding the
      jurisdiction. The order of CIT (A) is thus vitiated in law.

                                                                      Page | 4
     16.   That the order of the learned CIT(A) is not only contradictory, vague,
           inconsistent but is wholly based on the facts which are erroneous or
           are non existing.
     17.   That in any case and without prejudice, the learned CIT(A) has further
           erred in failing to grant a valid and meaningful opportunity, despite the
           fact the assessee had no opportunity to rebut the; report which was
           unsupported by any evidence by the AO. That the: learned CIT (A) has
           further erred in failing to appreciate that the burden to establish the
           source of funds in the account: of the vendee was that of the assessee
           which has been used by the vendee. The learned CIT(A) has erred in,
           holding that such burden was of the assessee, despite the fact that
           even the vendee did not dispute the source of funds of his, who was
           himself assessed to tax and had acquired the property."







3.   In ITA number 2954/del/2018 for assessment year 2000 1415, another
     assessee Mr. Madan Mohan Sharma has also raised identical grounds of
     appeal.
4.   Ground no 1,2,3,14,1,5 and 16          are with respect to enhancements of
     assessment by CIT (A), Ground no 9,10,11, 12 and 13 are with respect to
     addition u/s 68 on enhancement made by CIT (A), Ground no 4,5 and 8
     are with respect to sales of the house property which has been held by CIT
     (A) on enhancement that assessee has not sold the house and hence there is
     no capital gain earned by the assessee but the sales consideration is
     chargeable to tax u/s 68 of the act, Ground no        6 and 7 on      claim of
     deduction u/s 54     of the act and ground no 17 on violation of natural
     justice by not affording proper opportunity of hearing.
5.   Brief facts of the case as extracted    from the orders of Shri Hari Mohan
     Sharma shows that assessee is an individual, engaged in the business of
     brokerage and deriving income from house property, income from capital
     gains, business income and income from other sources. He filed his return
     of income declaring an income of INR 15830870/­ on 31/10/2014.             His
     case was selected by The Assistant Commissioner of Income Tax, Circle ­ 63
     (1), New Delhi (the learned AO) for a limited scrutiny through computer
     assisted scrutiny system (CASS).

                                                                             Page | 5
6.   Assessee disclosed capital gain on sale of a residential house property at
     Rajendra Nagar, New Delhi jointly held with his 2 brothers Shri Brij Mohan
     Sharma and Shri Madan Mohan Sharma to           one shri Devki Nadan Taneja
     (HUF) on 22/5/2013 vide Agreement To Sale` for the total consideration of
     INR 187,500,000 with one third share of INR 62,500,000 of each brother.
     Assessee disclosed capital gain of Rs. INR 6,01,54,171/­        on sale of this
     property.
7.   Assessee also claimed exemption / deduction u/s 54 F of the act as sale
     consideration was invested by all the brothers jointly for the purchase of
     property at Karol   Bagh, New Delhi from one          company   Solitaire world
     private limited [ Solitaire] for the consideration of INR 54,000,000 by each
     brother and the sale deed is registered on 2/5/2014 with the sub- registrar
     ­ III, New Delhi. In substance, Assessee disclosed capital gain on the sale of
     property to Devki Nandan Taneja HUF and also claimed exemption u/s 54
     F of the act for property purchased from Solitaire.
     Assessment Proceedings


8.   The learned AO noted that assessee has claimed deduction under section
     54F of the income tax act of INR 55611328/­ which needs to be examined
     as case was selected for scrutiny for one of those reasons.      Therefore the
     AO asked assessee to submit the details of properties purchased.           The
     learned AO noted that the claim of the assessee under section 54F is invalid
     due to the fact that two residential properties were sold by the assessee.
     According to the AO the deduction under section 54F is only available if
     property other than a residential property is sold and assessee purchases a
     residential property and further assessee should not have more than one
     property in possession except the new property in which the assessee is
     investing the consideration on sale of other than residential property.
     Accordingly the deduction u/s 54F was denied. As learned AO noted that
     assessee is owner of various residential properties,     On being confronted
     with above facts, the assessee filed an application for revised computation
     and requested for the deduction alternatively u/s 54 of the income tax act.
     The AO denied the deduction or the alternative claim        relying upon the
     decision of the honourable Supreme Court in case of Goetz India Ltd vs.

                                                                             Page | 6
       CIT (2006) 284 ITR 323 as the claim was not through revised return.
       Therefore the learned AO held that assessee cannot be allowed deduction
       under section 54 of the income tax act also.     Accordingly the deduction
       claimed by the assessee u/s 54F of the act of Rs. 55611328/- was denied
       and claim of the alternative deduction under section 54 of the act was also
       rejected. Accordingly the total income of the assessee was assessed at INR
       71442200/­ against the returned income of INR 1 5830870 by an order u/s
       143 (3) of the income tax act, 1961 on 27/12/2016.
       Appellate proceedings before CIT (A)
9.     The assessee aggrieved with the order of the learned AO preferred an appeal
       before The Learned Commissioner of Income Tax (Appeals) ­ 20, New Delhi.
       It was submitted before her that the AO should have granted deduction
       under section 54 of the act as it was a revised claim of the assessee
       alternatively.   The assessee also relied upon several decisions of the
       coordinate benches and the circular number 14 (XL ­ 35) dated 11/4/1955
       stating that the assessing officer was to consider even claims of refunds
       even if not made by the assessee by drawing attention of the assessee to his
       rights. Accordingly assessee submitted that if the claim of the assessee was
       not found tenable under section 54F of the act but under section 54 of the
       act, assessee should have been granted such deduction.       It was further
       stated that there was no requirement of filing the revised return for the
       above claim relying upon the decision of the Solaris biochemical Ltd vs.
       DCIT ITA number 987 of 2011 dated 13/7/2012. It was further stated that
       that such new or additional claim can well be entertained by the CIT ­ A
       and for this proposition assessee relied on decision of the honourable
       Bombay High Court in CIT vs. Pruthvi Share brokers and shareholders
       private limited (2012) 349 ITR 336 (Bom).
     A. Enquiry made by CIT (A)   of new property purchased by the assessee
       On instruction of CIT -A , Therefore to check the authenticity of the
       documents, verification was made by the office of AO central circle ­ 25
       where the company solitaire word private limited was assessed and it was
       gathered that that company has cancelled sale deed by a memorandum of
       understanding dated 11/4/2016 signed by the appellant with his other
       brothers and the confirmation was filed in case of the company by them that

                                                                            Page | 7
  these are the advances against the sale which was returned back by the
  company subsequently and      , therefore, in effect Solitaire never purchased
  the property from the brothers. This fact was confronted to the assessee
  and assessee explained that the possession     of property purchased by the
  assessee and his brothers from the above company was not handed over to
  the appellant on the ground that property could not be released as it was
  hypothecated with a Finance company from whom the seller has raised the
  loans. Due to this one of the brothers did not get the property registered and
  therefore the memorandum of understanding was entered. On 3/5/2016
  the cancellation agreement was entered and subsequently a mediation
  petition was filed before Hon.      Delhi High Court.       Subsequently on
  3/8/2017, settlement agreement was executed between the solitaire word
  private limited and the 3 brothers, by which the company has repurchased
  2/3rd share of Shri Madan Mohan Sharma and Brij Mohan Sharma for a
  total consideration of INR 120,000,000. Appellant has entered into a
  contract with the company for developing the property by constructing
  residential dwelling units with the promise to get 5 units with basement
  along with 2 car parking and one servant quarter for each unit in lieu of his
  one third undivided share of the property. The assessee also produced a
  partition deed dated 24/10/2017 for a consideration of INR 60,100,000.
  Therefore as per the terms and conditions    of the agreements of the deed ,
  appellant is the joint owner of the entire built up property of 1/3 undivided
  share in the company as 2/3rd undivided share. The assessee also stated
  that one third share which is sold to Sri Brij Mohan Sharma was never
  registered because of the property being hypothecated to the finance
  company.
B. Enquiry made by CIT (A) for capital gain shown by the assessee


    i.   Now the CIT ­A desired to know about the sale of the property made
         by the assessee on which he has earned the capital gain. CIT asked
         the learned assessing officer to conduct further enquiry regarding the
         authenticity of the sale made by the appellant of the property at
         Rajendra Nagar as assessee has produced only the agreement to sale



                                                                         Page | 8
       and registered sale deed was not produced by the appellant. The AO
       did conduct enquiry which showed that
          a) Till the date the property is not registered in the name of the
             purchaser HUF nor was the possession of the property handed
             over to the purchaser.
          b) On physical verification of the property the nameplate of the
             wife of the appellant was appearing and office was running in
             the name of Munna Lal Sharma Buildcon private limited,
          c) on the record of sub- registrar the property was not registered
             for any sale and purchase,
          d) on the Face book page the address of Munna Lal Sharma
             Buildcon private limited appears at that address of which seem
             of   Hari Mohan Sharma       and Sri Brij Mohan Sharma are
             directors and
          e) In the return of income of that company for assessment year
             2017 ­ 18 the above address of new Rajendra Nagar property is
             shown.
ii.    When confronted with this enquiries,        assessee submitted that
       property is owned by Devki Nandan Taneja HUF,         it is   was rarely
       used by the brother of the assessee and no modifications were carried
       out by the buyer, therefore the logo of the company as well as the
       name of the wife of the assessee was not removed. The assessee also
       submitted affidavits by the buyer to confirm the above facts.


iii.   The learned CIT ­ A therefore made a further enquiry from the
       bankers of the buyer of the property regarding the source of money
       which was claimed by the assessee as received from the buyer of the
       property. Information was also gathered by the CIT Appeal that the
       purchaser of the property has not reflected these transactions in the
       return of income      for assessment year 2017 ­ 18.     Therefore she
       issued summons to the buyer of the property at the address given in
       the agreement to sale. Summons came back unserved.                    On
       confronted, assessee submitted latest address of the buyer. Summons
       were further issued and served but same was not complied with.

                                                                         Page | 9
iv.    The learned CIT ­ A also got enquiry into the bank account of the
       buyer with Indian bank which revealed that just before making the
       payment by      buyer to the appellant on 29/10/2013         of    Rs.
       18,75,00,000, there were deposits made in that bank account on the
       same date totaling to INR 187,400,000.
 v.    Therefore the learned CIT ­ A noted that the property was never sold,
       as neither the registry was made nor physical possession was given
       and the source of money given by the purchaser to the assessee also
       could not be explained. Hence , enhancement notice was given to the
       appellant on 15/3/2018 to show cause why the sale consideration of
       INR 62,500,000 should not be treated as unexplained.
vi.    The learned CIT ­ A also continued the further bank enquiry through
       the assessing officer which revealed that appellant and his 2 brothers
       have transferred the amount of INR 52,500,000 each on 29/10/2013
       which in a circular route came back to the assessee which resulted
       into the so-called sale consideration received by the assessee. As per
       the report of the AO, three brothers transferred INR 52,500,000 each
       to     one company Logic Commercial Enterprises Private Limited,
       which in turn issued the sums to Om Shivam Informatics Pvt Ltd,
       Paramount infra developers private Limited, Divya Jyoti Softech P Ltd
       ,    and Trinity farms P Ltd. All these companies in turn transferred
       the sum to Sri Devki Nandan Taneja ( HUF) and then that HUF
       transferred the sum of INR 62,500,000 to each of the brothers.
       Therefore another enhancement notice under section 251 (1) and 251
       (2) was issued to the assessee to show cause why a sum of INR
       62,500,000 should not be treated as unexplained as the claim of the
       sale consideration received from the HUF was found to be a false
       claim.
vii.   On 27/3/2017, assessee submitted objecting to the enhancement
       notice stating that the CIT ­ A is tackling a new source of income,
       which is not permitted.    The assessee relied on the decision of the
       honourable Delhi High Court in 251 ITR 864 and also 240 ITR 556. It
       was further stated that even if such addition is required to be made
       there is a separate provision in law under section 147/148 and

                                                                     Page | 10
        section 263 of the income tax act but such right does not vests in CIT
        ­ A.   The assessee also relied upon the decision of the honourable
        Supreme Court in 66 ITR 443.
viii.   On the fact of the issue, assessee also stated that the buyer, on
        29/10/2013 transferred above sum through RTGS and on perusal of
        the bank statement of the buyer there was an opening balance on that
        date amounting to INR 196,200,000 and thereafter there are further
        credits and before making     RTGS     there is credit balance of INR
        125,188741/-    in the bank account of the buyer.      Therefore before
        issuing enhancement notice the learned CIT ­ A has not considered
        bank account of the transferee. Therefore it was stated that it is a
        misconception that the money received by the assessee was routed
        through bank accounts and is the sum of the assessee only.          The
        assessee submitted statement of account of the buyer duly confirmed
        which clearly shows that     buyer has made investment in various
        properties. The affidavit of the buyer was also placed on record. The
        assessee also submitted that even if the observation of the CIT appeal
        are presumed to be correct even then since the amount credited in the
        bank account of the transfer duly recorded in the bank account of the
        transferee along with the source thereof, appellant has not been able
        to understand that how could same be treated as unexplained credit
        under the provisions of section 68 of the income tax act. The assessee
        also asked the learned CIT ­ A to summon the buyer of the property
        and also explained that what is the reason that the document was not
        registered and constructive possession was already given to the buyer.
 ix.    Learned CIT ­ A rejected the argument of the assessee with respect to
        the new source of income stating that the assessee has shown capital
        gain on sale of the property and claimed deduction under section 54F
        which was denied by the AO and on enquiry it was gathered that
        there was no sale of the property and therefore the provisions of
        section 68 of the income tax act are attracted. The learned CIT ­ A
        rejected various decisions relied upon by the assessee and stated that
        the power of the learned CIT ­ A ranges over the whole assessment to
        correct the assessing officer not only with regard to a matter raised by

                                                                        Page | 11
     the assessee in appeal but also with regard to any other matter which
     has been considered by the assessing officer and determined in the
     course of assessment.     She further referred to the powers of the
     learned CIT ­ A under section 251 of the income tax act and held that
     the powers are validly executed by her. She relied on the decision of
     the honourable Supreme Court in case of jute Corp of India Ltd vs.
     CIT 187 ITR 688 and 224 ITR 610.         She further relied upon the
     decision of honourable Punjab and Haryana High Court in 297 ITR 72
     and stated that the only precondition mentioned for exercising the
     powers to enhance the income is that the same should be done only
     after providing adequate opportunity of hearing to the assessee. She
     further stated that there is no restriction under the act that the
     information which could form the basis of the enhancement of income
     could not be sourced from the assessing officer.         She therefore
     rejected the argument of the assessee against the power of the learned
     CIT ­ A of enhancement.
x.   On the merits of the case she stated that that the claim of the
     assessee that the property was purchased by the buyer through
     constructive physical possession since it was found that the market
     value of the property has fallen down and they did not get it registered
     and buyer wanted to resile     from the agreement and was seeking
     compensation and therefore the agreement of sale has not yet
     culminated into a sale deed, she stated that this fact is proved against
     the appellant that the said transaction is nothing but a colorable
     transaction by which the appellant has routed his own unaccounted
     money in the form of the sale consideration which never took place in
     reality.   Therefore, as the property was not sold    by the appellant,
     capital gain has not at all arose to the assessee. She therefore held
     that the evidences collected in the case substantiate     that   money
     received by      appellant as sale consideration is nothing but
     unexplained credit in the hands of the appellant for the reason that
     physical possession of the property was never transferred,            no
     registration of the property took place, result of the bank enquiries
     show that the money routed through various companies returned

                                                                      Page | 12
            back to the appellant. She ,         therefore on the principle of
            preponderance of probability, made addition holding that assessee
            has failed to give any satisfactory explanation of sum received on the
            alleged sale consideration of the property under section 68 of the act.
            She further relied upon the host of the decisions in her order to hold
            that the addition u/s 68 is required to be made. She therefore held
            that the sale consideration of INR 62,500,000 claimed by the
            appellant to have received a sale consideration is nothing but a
            colourable transaction by which the appellant has routed his own
            unaccounted money in the form of the sale consideration which never
            took place in the reality. She also initiated the penalty proceedings
            u/s 271 (1)( c) for concealment of the income. She further held that
            assessing officer is directed to reduce the capital gain shown by the
            appellant in the return of income from the sale of the property of
            Rajendra Nagar as transaction never took place. In nutshell , learned
            CIT ­ A held that the sale consideration received by the assessee of
            INR 62,500,000 is assessable under section 68 of the income tax act
            as unexplained cash credit (unexplained income) of the assessee
            applying the provisions of section 115BBE of the act and further the
            capital gain shown by the assessee of INR 6,01,54,171/­ is not
            chargeable to tax in the hands of the assessee.
      xi.   Consequently , Learned assessing officer passed an order under
            section 250 read with section 143 (3) of the income tax act on
            15/05/2018 reducing the assessed income of the assessee of INR
            7,14,42,200/­ by the capital gain offered by the assessee on the sale
            of property of INR 6,01,54,171/- and making an addition on account
            of enhancement made by the learned CIT ­ A under section 68 read
            with section 115 BBE of the income tax act of INR 62,500,000/- .
            Thereby net income of the assessee was enhanced by INR 23,45,829/-
            resulting into the net taxable income of the assessee of INR
            7,37,88,029/­. Assessee, aggrieved with the order of the learned CIT
            ­ A, has preferred this appeal.
Submission of the Assessee



                                                                           Page | 13
10.   The learned authorised representative has made the extensive arguments on
      the following points:-
       i.    That the learned CIT ­ A has deleted/reduced the income of the
             assessee by not considering the long-term capital gain offered by the
             assessee in the return of income. The revenue has not challenged this
             issue before the tribunal in an appeal, therefore now the issue has
             become final that the long-term capital gain shown by the assessee in
             the return of income is not chargeable to tax even otherwise.        He
             stated that this issue has now become final that the sum of INR 6
             0154171/­ shown by the assessee as the long-term capital gain from
             the sale of property is not chargeable to tax in the hands of the
             assessee. He submitted that        this issue is not challenged by the
             assessee also, therefore now the capital gain cannot be charged in the
             hands of the assessee irrespective of the fate    of the other issues in
             the appeal of the assessee       with respect to enhancement        and
             addition u/s 68 of the Act.
       ii.   That by filing revised computation of the total income before the
             assessing officer, no new claim was made but only the correct
             provision of the law      was applied by the assessee as for claiming
             deduction under section 54 of the income tax act. Assesses can hold
             any number of houses and condition of owning only one residential
             house is only present in section 54F and not under section 54 of the
             act. Hence ld AO as well as CT (A) should have allowed the deduction
             u/s 54 of the Act.     Assessee relied on the decision of the coordinate
             bench in 150 TTJ 581, 44 SOT 617, and 56 SOT 473.
      iii.   With respect to the sales made of the residential house property and
             consideration received it was stated that that the flowchart prepared
             by the learned CIT ­ A is contrary to the facts and material available
             on record as the appellant along with his brothers has 1st received the
             money against the sale of property from the buyer.         For this he
             prepared a flow chart showing that the above money was first
             credited into the bank account of the assessee and after that the
             cheques were issued.      He stated that out of the sale consideration
             received , assessee has transferred money to the company and not

                                                                             Page | 14
       before that. He also explained the same by filing a separate chart of
       the funds.
iv.    With respect to investment made in the new property he submitted
       that further developments are with regard to the later assessment
       years and have no bearing insofar as the instant case for assessment
       year 2014 ­ 15 is concerned. The effect of the subsequent even shall
       be given in the year in which the said event took place and as such
       the assessee is entitled to claim of deduction under section 54 of the
       act. He further relied on the decision of the coordinate benches to
       substantiate his claim.
 v.    With respect to the enhancement made by the learned CIT ­ A he
       challenged it vehemently and stated that it is beyond the powers of
       the learned CIT ­ A to find out the new sources of the income. He
       further stated that the subject matter of the appeal was limited to the
       allowability of the claim of deduction under section 54 of the income
       tax act and the learned CIT ­ A has tackled a new source of income
       which is not permitted under the law. He stated that while examining
       the allowability of claim of deduction under section 54 of the act the
       learned CIT ­ A has altogether held that the sale of the property is
       false and the amount of INR 62,500,000/- received by the assessee
       towards the sale of the property, which is confirmed by the buyer, is
       an unaccounted income of the assessee. He stated that such powers
       are not vested with CIT Appeal.
vi.    He relied upon the decision of the honourable Supreme Court in
       commissioner    of   income-tax   (central),   Calcutta   v.Rai   Bahadur
       Hardutroy Motilal Chamaria 66 ITR 443, decision of the honourable
       Delhi high court in commissioner of income-tax v. Sardari lal and co.
       251 ITR 864, commissioner of income-tax v. union tyres 240 ITR 556,
       commissioner of income-tax v. B. P. Sherafudin 399 ITR 524.
vii.   He further submitted that the instant case of scrutiny before the
       learned assessing officer was of a limited scrutiny and therefore the
       learned CIT ­ A cannot travel beyond the issues which were
       specifically mentioned in the limited scrutiny notice and as such the
       enhancement notice so issued is without jurisdiction. To support his

                                                                          Page | 15
             proposition he relied upon the decision of the coordinate benches in
             93 ITD 144, 108 TTJ 312 and 162 taxmann 212.
11.   He also referred to the chronological sequence of the events and the facts
      occurring on those dates along with a chart showing source of funds of the
      assessee and the buyer of the property. He further submitted a copy of the
      several documents in the form of the paper book submitted before the lower
      authorities along with the several bank accounts of the assessee and the
      buyer. He also submitted a copy of the several judgments relied upon by
      him.
      Arguments of the Revenue
12.   Learned senior departmental representative vehemently supported the
      orders of lower authorities. She extensively read order of the learned CIT ­
      A with respect to the finding given by her that there is no sale of the
      property and therefore there is no reason to grant any deduction under
      section 54 or 54F of the income tax act. She further heavily supported the
      powers of the learned CIT ­ A regarding enhancement of income.           She
      submitted that the new source of income has not been tackled by the
      learned CIT ­ A but she has just looked at the return of income of the
      assessee and examined the detail of the sale of the property against which
      the deduction has been claimed by the assessee. She further stated that it
      is conclusively proved by the learned CIT ­ A by the extensive enquiry
      carried out through the learned assessing officer that the impugned sale
      consideration shown by the assessee is an unaccounted and unexplained
      income of the assessee and therefore same is rightly added under section 68
      of the income tax act.
      Issues before us
13.   On the basis of above facts, orders of lower authorities and arguments of the
      parties following issues emerges for our consideration raised in various
      grounds of appeal.
       i.    Whether the ld CIT (A) has correctly assumed the power          while
             enhancing income of the assessee?
       ii.   Whether the ld CIT (A) has correctly made the addition of income u/s
             68 of the act of Rs 62500000/-,



                                                                           Page | 16
      iii.   In the given facts , Whether the assessee is entitled to deduction u/s
             54 of the act or not
             Decision and Reasons
14.   Coming to the first issue of   challenge to powers of enhancements by the
      ld CIT (A), Powers of ld CIT (A) are enshrined u/s 251 of the act as under :-
       "251. POWERS OF THE(...)COMMISSIONER (APPEALS).
       (1) In disposing of an appeal, the Commissioner (Appeals) shall have the
       following powers--
              (a) in an appeal against an order of assessment, he may confirm,
              reduce, enhance or annul the assessment ;
              (aa) in an appeal against the order of assessment in respect of which
              the proceeding before the Settlement Commission abates under
              section 245HA, he may, after taking into consideration all the material
              and other information produced by the assessee before, or the results
              of the inquiry held or evidence recorded by, the Settlement
              Commission, in the course of the proceeding before it and such other
              material as may be brought on his record, confirm, reduce, enhance or
              annul the assessment ;
              (b) in an appeal against an order imposing a penalty, he may confirm
              or cancel such order or vary it so as either to enhance or to reduce the
              penalty;
              (c) in any other case, he may pass such orders in the appeal as he
              thinks fit.
       (2) The Commissioner (Appeals) shall not enhance an assessment or a
       penalty or reduce the amount of refund unless the appellant has had a
       reasonable opportunity of showing cause against such enhancement or
       reduction.
       Explanation In disposing of an appeal, the Commissioner (Appeals) may
       consider and decide any matter arising out of the proceedings in which the
       order appealed against was passed, notwithstanding that such matter was
       not raised before the Commissioner (Appeals) by the appellant."


15.   Honourable Delhi High court        in [2012] 348 ITR 170 (Del)        GURINDER
      MOHAN SINGH NINDRAJOG v. COMMISSIONER OF INCOME-TAX                          has

                                                                               Page | 17
visualized   in para no 19 and 20     has   laid down the guidance when the
powers of the enhancement by the ld CIT (A) are validly invoked. The
Honourable High court held that
       19. We have considered the submissions of both the parties. There
       is no doubt about the fact that while framing the assessment even
       under section 143(3) of the Act, the Assessing Officer may omit to
       make certain additions of income or omit to disallow certain claims
       which are not admissible under the provisions of the Act thereby
       leading to escapement of income. The Income-tax Act provides for
       remedial measures which can be taken under these circumstances.
       While framing an assessment under section 143(3) of the Act, any of
       the following situations may occur :
               (a) the Assessing Officer may accept the return of income
               without making any addition or disallowance ; or
               (b) the assessment is framed and the Assessing Officer makes
               certain addition or disallowance and in making such
               additions or disallowances, he deals with such item or items
               of income in the body of order of assessment but he under
               assessed such sums ; or
               (c) he makes no addition in respect of some of the items,
               though in the course of hearing before him holds a discussion
               of such items of income ;
               (d) yet, there can be another situation where the Assessing
               Officer inadvertently omits to tax an amount which ought to
               have been taxed and in respect of which he does not make
               any enquiry ;
               (e) further another situation may arise, where an item or
               items of income or expenditure, incurred and claimed is not
               at all considered and an assessment is framed, as a result
               thereof, a prejudice is caused to the Revenue, or
               (f) where an item of income which ought to have been taxed
               remained untaxed, and there is an escapement of income, as
               a result of the assessee's failure to disclose fully and truly all
               material facts necessary for computation of income.

                                                                         Page | 18
20. To ensure for each of such situations, an income which ought to
have been taxed and remained untaxed, the Legislature has provided
different remedial measures as are contained in sections 251(1)(a),
263, 154 and 147 of the Act.
21. In the category stated in (a), obviously if an income escapes an
assessment, the provisions of section 147 of the Act can be invoked,
subject to the condition stated in the proviso to the said section. In
the category of cases falling in category (b), section 251(1)(a) provides
the Commissioner of Income-tax (Appeals) could enhance such an
assessment qua the under assessed sum, i.e., where the Assessing
Officer had dealt with the issue in the assessment and was the
subject-matter of appeal. In category falling in       (c) and (e), the
Commissioner of Income-tax has been empowered to take an
appropriate action under section 263 of the Act In the category of
cases falling under clauses (d) and (f), appropriate action under
section 147 of the Act can be taken to tax the income which has
escaped assessment or had remained to be taxed. There can be
situations where an item has been dealt with in the body of the order
of assessment and the assessee being aggrieved from the addition or
disallowances so made, had preferred an appeal before the
Commissioner of Income-tax (Appeals) against the said addition and
disallowance, the said disallowance and addition being the subject-
matter of appeal before the Commissioner of Income-tax (Appeals) in
such cases, the Commissioner of Income-tax (Appeals) has been
empowered under section 251(1)(a) of the Act to enhance such an
income where the Assessing Officer had proceeded to make addition
or disallowance by dealing with the same in the body of order of
assessment by under assessing the same as the same was the
subject-matter of the appeal as per the grounds of the appeal raised
before him. In other words, the Commissioner of Income-tax
(Appeals) has a power of enhancement in respect of such item or
items of income which has been dealt with in the body of the order of
the assessment, and arose for his consideration as per the grounds of
appeal raised before him, being the subject-matter of appeal.

                                                                 Page | 19
16.   On the basis of the    above decision following remedial matrix as per the
      law is as under :-
      Sr No   Situation                                          Remedial             Measures
                                                                 under the Income tax
                                                                 Act
      a       Assessing Officer may accept the return U/s              147       of   the   act
              of income without making any addition subject                 to    limitations
              or disallowance ; or                               contained therein
      b       the     assessment     is   framed   and    the u/s 251 (1) (a) where
              Assessing Officer makes certain addition the             Assessing        Officer
              or disallowance and in making such had dealt with the issue
              additions or disallowances, he deals with in the assessment and
              such item or items of income in the body was the subject-matter
              of order of assessment but he under of appeal
              assessed such sums ;
      c       AO makes no addition in respect of some U/s 263 of the act
              of the items, though in the course of
              hearing before him holds a discussion of
              such items of income
      d       where the Assessing Officer inadvertently u/s 147 of the act
              omits to tax an amount which ought to
              have been taxed and in respect of which
              he does not make any enquiry
      e       where an item or items of income or U/s 263 of the act
              expenditure, incurred and claimed is not
              at all considered and an assessment is
              framed, as a result thereof, a prejudice is
              caused to the Revenue,
      f       where an item of income which ought to u/s 147 of the act
              have been taxed remained untaxed, and
              there is an escapement of income, as a
              result of the assessee's failure to disclose
              fully    and   truly    all   material     facts

                                                                                       Page | 20
              necessary for computation of income


17.   In the same decision honourable Delhi High court after considering the
      provision of section 251(1) (a) of the act further held that
          25. In CIT v. Rai Bahadur Hardutroy Motilal Chamaria [1967] 66 ITR
          443 (SC) where the Supreme Court interpreted the corresponding
          provision under the old Income-tax Act, 1922, the legal position was
          stated as under (page 450) :
              "The principle that emerges as a result of the authorities of this
              court is that the Appellate Assistant Commissioner has no
              jurisdiction, under section 31(3) of the Act, to assess a source of
              income which has not been processed by the Income-tax Officer and
              which is not disclosed either in the returns filed by the assessee or
              in the assessment order, and, therefore, the Appellate Assistant
              Commissioner cannot travel beyond the subject-matter of the
              assessment. In other words, the power of enhancement under
              section 31(3) of the
            Page No : 0186
              Act is restricted to the subject-matter of assessment or the sources
              of income which have been considered expressly or by clear
              implication by the Income-tax Officer from the point of view of the
              taxability of the assessee. It was argued by Mr. Vishwanath Iyer on
              behalf of the appellant that by applying the principle to the present
              case, the Appellate Assistant Commissioner had jurisdiction to
              enhance the quantum of income of the assessee. It was pointed out
              that the fact of alleged transfer of Rs. 5,85,000 to Forbesganj branch
              was noted by the Income-tax Officer and also the fact that it did not
              reach Forbesganj on the same day. So it was argued that in the
              appeal the Appellate Assistant Commissioner had jurisdiction to
              deal with the question of the taxability of the amount of Rs.
              5,85,000 and to hold that it was taxable as undisclosed profits in
              the hands of the assessee. We are unable to accept the argument
              put forward on behalf of the appellant as correct. It is true that the
              Income-tax Officer has referred to the remittance of Rs. 5,85,000

                                                                            Page | 21
   from the Calcutta branch, but the Income- tax Officer considered the
   dispatch of this amount only with a view to test the genuineness of
   the entries relating to Rs. 4,30,000 in the books of the Forbesganj
   branch. It is manifest that the Income-tax Officer did not consider
   the remittance of Rs. 5,85,000 in the process of assessment from the
   point of view of its taxability. It is also manifest that the Appellate
   Assistant Commissioner has considered the amount of remittance of
   Rs. 5,85,000 from a different aspect, namely, the point of view of its
   taxability. But since the Income-tax Officer has not applied his mind
   to the question of the taxability or non-taxability of the amount of
   Rs.   5,85,000   the   Appellate   Assistant   Commissioner   had   no
   jurisdiction, in the circumstances of the present case, to enhance
   the taxable income of the assessee on the basis of this amount of Rs.
   5,85,000 or of any portion thereof. As we have already stated, it is
   not open to the Appellate Assistant Commissioner to travel outside
   the record, i.e., the return made by the assessee or the assessment
   order of the Income-tax Officer with a view to find out new sources of
   income and the power of enhancement under section 31(3) of the Act
   is restricted to the sources of income which have been the subject-
   matter of consideration by the Income-tax Officer from the point of
   view of taxability. In this context 'consideration' does not mean
   'incidental' or 'collateral' examination of any matter by the Income-
   tax Officer in the process of assessment. There must be something
   in the assessment order to show that the Income-tax Officer applied
   his mind to the particular subject-matter or the
 Page No : 0187
 particular source of income with a view to its taxability or to its non
 taxability and not to any incidental connection. In the present case, it
 is manifest that the Income-tax Officer has not considered the entry of
 Rs. 5,85,000 from the points of view of its taxability and, therefore,
 the Appellate Assistant Commissioner had no jurisdiction in an
 appeal under section 31 of the Act, to enhance the assessment."
26. To the same effect is the judgment of another Division Bench of this
court in CIT v. Union Tyres [1999] 240 ITR 556 (Delhi) reiterating that

                                                                  Page | 22
the first appellate authority cannot consider new scope of income under
section 251(1) of the Act. The following question from the same
judgment can aptly be (page 559) :
       "Section 251 of the Act prescribes the power of the Appellate
       Assistant Commissioner, now the Commissioner (Appeals).
       Section 251(1)(a) of the Act empowers the Appellate Assistant
       Commissioner in disposing of an appeal by the assessee against
       an order of assessment to confirm, reduce, enhance or annul
       the assessment or to set aside and refer the case back to the
       Income-tax Officer for making fresh assessment in accordance
       with     the    directions   given     by   the   Appellate   Assistant
       Commissioner. The Explanation to section 251 provides that
       the Appellate Assistant Commissioner may hear and decide any
       matter arising out of the proceedings in which the order
       appealed against was passed notwithstanding that such a
       matter     was    not    raised   before    the   Appellate   Assistant
       Commissioner by the appellant.
       The issue with regard to the scope of powers of the first
       appellate authority in disposing of an appeal has come up
       before the courts umpteen times but we do not propose to
       burden the judgment by making reference to all the decisions
       on the point. We will notice a few decisions which we consider
       are relevant to answer the question referred. In CIT v. Shapoorji
       Pallonji Mistry [1962] 44 ITR 891 (SC), while construing the
       corresponding provisions of the Indian Income- tax Act, 1922,
       relating   to    the    jurisdiction   of   the   Appellate   Assistant
       Commissioner in such an appeal, the Supreme Court held that,
       in an appeal filed by the assessee, the Appellate Assistant
       Commissioner has no power to enhance the assessment by
       discovering a new source of income, not considered by the
       Income-tax Officer in the order appealed against. Similar views
       were expressed by the apex court in CIT v. Rai Bahadur
       Hardutroy Motilal Chamaria [1967] 66 ITR 443 (SC). It was held



                                                                      Page | 23
       that the power of enhancement under section 31(3) of the 1922
       Act was restricted to the subject-matter of the assessment
       Page No : 0188
      or the source of income which had been considered expressly or
      by clear implication by the Income-tax Officer from the point of
      view of taxability and that the Appellate Assistant Commissioner
      had no power to assess a source of income which had not been
      processed by the Assessing Officer."
27. At the same time, the court also clarified that the power of the first
appellate authority is not restricted to examine only those aspects of
assessment about which the assessee makes a grievance but it covers
the whole assessment to correct the order of the Assessing Officer not
only with regard to the matter raised by the assessee in appeal but also
with regard to any other matter which has been considered by the
Assessing Officer and determined in the course of assessment. This
principle can be traced to the following discussion in the said judgment
(page 561) :
       "Thus,    the    principle   emerging    from    the    aforenoted
       pronouncements of the Supreme Court is, that the first
       appellate authority is invested with very wide powers under
       section 251(1)(a) of the Act and once an assessment order is
       brought before the authority, his competence is not restricted to
       examining only those aspects of the assessment about which
       the assessee makes a grievance and ranges over the whole
       assessment to correct the Assessing Officer not only with regard
       to a matter raised by the assessee in appeal but also with
       regard to any other matter which has been considered by the
       Assessing Officer and determined in the course of assessment.
       However, there is a solitary but significant limitation to the
       power of revision, viz., that it is not open to the Appellate
       Assistant Commissioner to introduce in the assessment a new
       source of income and the assessment has to be confined to
       those items of income which where the subject-matter of
       original assessment."

                                                                  Page | 24
          28. The aforesaid view taken by the Division Bench was confirmed by
          the Full Bench of this court in CIT v. Sardari Lal and Co. [2001] 251
          ITR 864 (Delhi) [FB] observing as under (page 871) :
                 "Looking from the aforesaid angles, the inevitable conclusion is
                 that whenever the question of taxability of income from a new
                 source of income is concerned, which had not been considered
                 by the Assessing Officer, the jurisdiction to deal with the same
                 in appropriate cases may be dealt with under section 147/148
                 of the Act and section 263 of the Act, if requisite conditions are
                 fulfilled. It is inconceivable that in the presence of such specific
                 provisions, a similar power is available to the first appellate
                 authority. That being the position, the decision in Union Tyres'
                 case [1999] 240 ITR 556 (Delhi)
                 Page No : 0189
                 of this court expresses the correct view and does not need
                 reconsideration. This reference is accordingly disposed of."
                                                        [ underline supplied by us]







18.   Further Honourable kerala High court in B P Sherafudin`s case [ supra)
      while examining the     powers of CIT (A) u/s 251 (1) (a) of the act on
      enhancement has examined the whole judicial precedent         as under :-
           Precedential position :
           39. A Full Bench of this court in CIT v. Best Wood Industries and Saw
           Mills [2011] 331 ITR 63 (Ker) [FB] has examined the powers of the
           Assessing Officer, but not the appellate authority. It has held that
           once the assessment is reopened for any valid reason recorded under
           section 148(2), then the entire assessment is open for the Assessing
           Officer to bring to tax any item of escaped income which comes to his
           notice in such reassessment.
           40. Under the old Income-tax Act, the corresponding provision is
           section 31. Interpreting that provision, the Supreme Court in CIT v.
           Kanpur Coal Syndicate [1964] 53 ITR 225 (SC) has held that under
           section 31(3)(a), in disposing of an appeal, the appellate authority may



                                                                             Page | 25
confirm, reduce, enhance or annul the assessment ; under clause (b),
he may set aside the
Page No : 0536
assessment and direct the Income-tax Officer now AO to make a fresh
assessment. The appellate authority has, therefore, plenary powers in
disposing of an appeal. "The scope of his power is conterminous with
that of the Income-tax Officer. He can do what the Income-tax Officer
can do and also direct him to do what he has failed to do".
41. As we can see, CIT v. P. Mohanakala [2007] 291 ITR 278 (SC)
deals with the powers of the High Court in interfering with the
findings of fact--and concurrent findings, at that by re-appreciating
the evidence. The Supreme Court has held in the negative. The
Supreme Court in Jute Corporation of India Ltd. v. CIT [1991] 187 ITR
688 (SC) has stated that the declaration of law is clear that the power
of the appellate authority is co-terminus with that of the Income-tax
Officer, and if that is so, there appears to be no reason why the
appellate authority cannot modify the assessment order on an
additional ground even if not raised before the Income-tax Officer. No
exception could be taken, held the Supreme Court in CIT v.
Nirbheram Daluram [1997] 224 ITR 610 (SC) to this view as the Act
places no restriction or limitation on exercising appellate power. Even
otherwise, an appellate authority while hearing the appeal against the
order of a subordinate authority, has all the powers which the original
authority may have in deciding the question before it subject to the
restrictions or limitation, if any, prescribed by the statutory
provisions. Absent any statutory provision, the appellate authority is
vested with all the plenary powers which the subordinate authority
may have.
42. In CIT v. Shapoorji Pallonji Mistry [1962] 44 ITR 891 (SC), the
assessment year was 1947-48, and the case was finally decided in
February 14, 1962. So the Act considered was pre-Independence
enactment. Examining section 31 of the old Act, the Supreme Court
has held that there is no doubt that the appellate authority can
"enhance the assessment". This power must, at least, fall within the

                                                               Page | 26
words "enhance the assessment", if they are not to be rendered wholly
nugatory.
43. Now, we may examine the authorities that also have dealt with the
powers of the appellate authority but seem to have taken a divergent
path.
44. In CIT v. Rai Bahadur Hardutroy Motilal Chamaria [1967] 66 ITR
443 (SC) a three-judge Bench of the Supreme Court has observed that
it is only the assessee who has a right conferred under section 31 to
prefer an appeal against the order of assessment made by the Income-
tax Officer. If the assessee does not appeal the order of assessment
becomes final subject to any power of revision that the Commissioner
may have under section 33B of the Act. Therefore, it would be wholly
erroneous to compare the powers of the appellate authority with the
powers possessed by a court of appeal,
Page No : 0537
under    the   Civil   Procedure    Code.      The   Appellate   Assistant
Commissioner is not an ordinary court of appeal. It is impossible to
talk of a court of appeal when only one party to the original decision is
entitled to appeal and not the other party, and because of this
peculiar position the statute has conferred very wide powers upon the
appellate authority once an appeal is preferred to him by the
assessee.
45. Chamaria goes on to hold that the appellate authority has no
jurisdiction under section 31(3) of the Act to assess a source of
income not processed by the Income-tax Officer "and which is not
disclosed either in the returns filed by the assessee or in the
assessment order," and therefore the appellate authority cannot travel
beyond the subject-matter of the assessment. In other words, the
power of enhancement under section 31(3) of the Act is restricted to
the subject-matter of assessment or the sources of income considered
expressly or by clear implication by the Income-tax Officer from the
viewpoint of the taxability of the assessee.
46. A question regarding powers of the first appellate authority came
up for consideration before the Supreme Court recently in CIT v.

                                                                  Page | 27
Nirbheram Daluram [1997] 224 ITR 610 (SC). Following the earlier
decisions in Kanpur Coal Syndicate and Jute Corporation of India, the
Supreme Court reiterated that the appellate powers conferred on the
Appellate Commissioner under section 251 could not be confined to
the matter considered by the Income-tax Officer, as the Appellate
Commissioner is vested with all the plenary powers which the Income-
tax Officer may have while making the assessment.
47. Indeed, examining Daluram's holding, a Division Bench of the
Delhi High Court in CIT v. Union Tyres, Delhi [1999] 240 ITR 556
(Delhi) has observed that Daluram did not comment whether these
wide powers also include the power to discover a new source of
income. So, Union Tyres concludes that the principle of law laid down
in Shapoorji and Chamaria still holds the field.
48. The principle emerging from various pronouncements of the
Supreme Court, Union Tyres observes, is that the first appellate
authority is invested with very wide powers under section 251(1)(a) of
the Act and once an assessment order is brought before the authority,
his competence is not restricted to examining only those aspects of
the assessment about which the assessee makes a grievance and
ranges over the whole assessment to correct the Assessing Officer not
only regarding a matter raised by the assessee in appeal but also
regarding any other matter considered by the Assessing Officer and
determined in assessment.
Page No : 0538
49. There is a solitary but significant limitation, according to Union
Tyres, to the power of revision : It is not open to the Appellate
Commissioner to introduce in the assessment a new source of income
and the assessment must be confined to those items of income which
were the subject-matter of the original assessment.
50. In course of time, Union Tyres was doubted. In CIT v. Sardari Lal
and Co. [2001] 251 ITR 864 (Delhi) [FB], the same issue whether the
appellate authority has the power under section 251 to discover a new
source of income was referred to a Full Bench. After examining the
authorities holding the fielding on that issue, the learned Full Bench

                                                              Page | 28
             has held that the inevitable conclusion is that whenever the question
             of taxability of income from a new source of income is concerned,
             which had not been considered by the Assessing Officer, the
             jurisdiction to deal with the same in appropriate cases may be dealt
             with under section 147, or section 148, or even section 263 of the Act
             if requisite conditions are fulfilled. It is inconceivable, according to
             Sardari Lal, that in the presence of such specific provisions, a similar
             power is available to the first appellate authority. Eventually, Sardari
             Lal upheld the decision in Union Tyres.
             51. Undeniably, the precedential position on the powers of the first
             appellate authority under section 251 undulates. There are seeming
             contradictions. But, as held by Union Tyres, and as affirmed on
             reference by Sardari Lal, there is a consistent judicial assertion that
             the powers under section 251 are, indeed, very wide ; but, wide as
             they are, they do not go to the extent of displacing powers under, say,
             sections 147, 148, and 263 of the Act.
             52. Therefore, we are in respectful agreement with the view taken by
             the Full Bench of the High Court of Delhi in Sardari Lal. As a
             corollary, we hold that the Tribunal's deleting the enhancement of Rs.
             22,15,116 and cancelling the order of the Commissioner of Income-
             tax (Appeals) on that issue call for no interference.
                                                          [Underline supplied by us]
19.   The principle culled out from the above judicial precedents clearly     shows
      that   words "enhance the assessment" are confined to the assessment
      reached through a particular process. It cannot be extended to the amount
      which ought to have been computed. There being other provisions which
      allow escaped income from new sources to be taxed after following a certain
      prescribed procedure. So long as a certain item of income had been
      considered and examined by the Assessing Officer from the point of view of
      its assessability and so long as the CIT(A) does not travel beyond the record
      of the year, there has never been any doubt as to his powers of redoing the
      categorization and bringing the assessment within the true description of
      the law



                                                                             Page | 29
20.   In the facts of the present case only issue considered and discussed by the
      assessing officer is with respect to claim of the assessee u/s 54F of the act
      which was rejected after inquiry and further claim alternatively made u/s
      54 of the act was also rejected relying up on the decision of the Honourable
      Supreme court. The issue of      verification of capital gain was not the issue
      which was     at all dealt with by the assessing officer, or even a question of
      verification made by    ld AO. There was    no inquiry made by the ld AO on
      the issue of capital gain shown by the assessee. The ld AO has not at all
      considered the issue of sales consideration received by the assessee on sale
      of   house as an issue of dispute before him. Therefore according to us, ld
      CIT (A) could not have made enhancement            on the issue holding that
      capital gain shown by the assessee itself is not in accordance with the law
      and given a finding that no capital gain has accrued to the assessee. CIT (A)
      further held that    funds received by the assessee is   unaccounted income
      of the assessee and chargeable to tax u/s 68 of the act. On the matrix as
      held by the Honorable Delhi high court        the above issue falls within the
      scope of the provision of section 147 of the act and not u/s 251 (1) (a) of the
      act. Further the Honourable Delhi high court in para no 27 has also held
      that power of the first appellate authority is not restricted to examine only
      those aspects of assessment about which the assessee makes a grievance
      but it covers the whole assessment to correct the order of the Assessing
      Officer not only with regard to the matter raised by the assessee in appeal
      but also with regard to any other matter which has been considered by the
      Assessing Officer and determined in the course of assessment. Therefore for
      the purpose of enhancement of income         by CIT (A) , it is necessary that
      either the matter should be raised in the appeal by the assessee or even
      otherwise the matter should ld have been considered        and determined in
      the course of assessment proceedings. It is not at all necessary that AO
      should have made any adjustment to the total income of the assessee.
      Hence, enhancement u/s 251 (1) (a) of the act is     prohibited on the issues
      which have not at all been considered by the AO during assessment
      proceedings. This gives the common understanding that           the ld CIT (A)
      cannot      enhance income of the assessee        on altogether new Source`.
      Therefore    it is clear that Therefore, the CIT(A) is not competent to enhance

                                                                             Page | 30
      the assessment taking an income which income was not considered
      expressly or by necessary implication by the Assessing Officer at all. Such is
      the mandate of the       decisions of various high courts such as in CIT vs.
      National Company Ltd. (1993) 199 ITR 445 (Cal),              Sait Bansilal and
      Raggisetti Veeranna vs. CIT (1972) 83 ITR 750 (AP), Sterling Construction &
      Trading Co. vs. ITO (1975) 99 ITR 236 (Kar) and Lokenath Tolaram vs. CIT
      (1986) 50 CTR (Bom) 237 : (1986) 161 ITR 82 (Bom). Hence issue no 1 I
      enlisted in para no 13    of the order is decided in favour of the assessee. In
      view of our decision on      issue no (i), issue no (ii) does not survive and
      issue no (iii) is dealt with separately. In view of this we allow ground no
      1,2,3,14,15 and 16 of the appeal of the assessee.
21.   As we have held that ld CIT (A) has exceeded his jurisdiction in enhancing
      the income of the assessee by     considering the new sources of income not
      at all considered by the ld AO, consequently we allow the ground no 9,
      10,11,12 and 13 of the appeal of the assessee where the addition u/s 68 of
      the act has been made by the ld CIT (A) enhancing income of the assessee
      holding that sale consideration received by the assessee on sale of property
      is chargeable to tax as undisclosed income u/s 68 of the act.
22.   Consequently    we also allow ground no 4 ,5 and 8 of the appeal of the
      assessee where the sales consideration received by the assessee of sale of
      property is chargeable to tax as capital gain and not as undisclosed income
      u/s 68 of the act. Further Ground no 6 and 7 of the appeal         with respect
      to claim of deduction u/s 54 of the act , we set aside it back to the file of the
      ld AO with a direction to verify whether assessee is eligible for deduction
      u/s 54 or not. The Assessee is directed to     put its claim in its entirety and
      ld AO may proceed in accordance with law after granting roper opportunity
      of hearing.
23.   Ground no 17 is against not affording reasonable opportunity of hearing to
      the assessee.    On conjoint reading of the assessment order as well as
      appellate order we do not find any merit in this ground of appeal as the
      assessee has been      granting enough opportunities at every stage. Hence
      Ground no 17 is dismissed.
24.   In the result appeal of the assessee is partly allowed for statistical
      purposes.

                                                                               Page | 31
25.   Identical issues are decided in case of Shri Madan Mohan Sharma In iTA
      no 2954/Del/2018 based on our decision in ITA No 2953/del/2018 , our
      decision in ITA No 2953/del/2018 applies Mutatis Muntandis in that appeal
      too. Accordingly that appeal is also partly allowed for statistical purposes.
26.   In the result both the appeals are partly allowed for statistical purposes.
      Order pronounced in the open court on 31/01/2019.
            -Sd/-                                                 -Sd/-
      (H.S.SIDHU)                                        (PRASHANT MAHARISHI)
      JUDICIAL MEMBER                                     ACCOUNTANT MEMBER

Dated: 31/01/2019
Copy forwarded to
  1. Applicant
  2. Respondent
  3. CIT
  4. CIT (A)
  5. DR:ITAT
                                                            ASSISTANT REGISTRAR
                                                               ITAT, New Delhi




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